Wildlife biologists shed light on how solar developments affect big game

News brief As solar energy surges, wildlife biologists in Wyoming have published a paper highlighting the challenges utility-scale solar projects pose to big game, like elk and deer. Beginning in 2018, the researchers monitored 20 GPS-collared pronghorn in southwest Wyoming before and after construction of the 80-megawatt Sweetwater Solar Facility, the first utility-scale solar development … Read more

Linked lanthanides shine light on field of crystal engineering

Rare earth metals, when linked, can act as a conduit for energy flow, and show promise for the development of novel materials. Rare earth metals, when linked, can act as a conduit for energy flow, and show promise for the development of novel materials. Scientists have connected two soft crystals and observed energy transfer between … Read more

Metaholographic platform that detects light exposure

During the COVID-19 pandemic last year, an incident occurred where vaccines exposed to room temperature had to be discarded. Biomedical substances, including vaccines, risk deterioration if not stored properly, so strict management is required during production and storage. In particular, exposure to light may reduce the vaccine’s efficacy, so it is important to check whether … Read more

Artificial light pollution raises concern for human and wildlife wellbeing

Jenny Ouyang, associate professor in the College of Science’s Department of Biology grew up in Xi’an, a large, brightly lit city in China. According to Ouyang, by 2025, over 80% of the world’s population will live under light polluted skies, which raises concern for human and wildlife well-being. Her background and the increased light pollution … Read more

Light as a tool for the synthesis of complex molecules

Chemists at the University of Münster have developed a novel and straightforward way to produce complex organic molecules. Mild reaction conditions, simple operation, scalability and the use of an inexpensive and commercially available photosensitizer make the method interesting for industrial applications. The results of the study are currently (Aug. 1) published in Nature Chemistry. Chemists … Read more

Harm from blue light exposure increases with age, Oregon State University

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The damaging effects of daily, lifelong exposure to the blue light emanating from phones, computers and household fixtures worsen as a person ages, new research by Oregon State University suggests. CORVALLIS, Ore. – The damaging effects of daily, lifelong exposure to the blue light emanating from phones, computers and household fixtures worsen … Read more

Researchers develop new AI system using light to learn

Researchers at Oxford University’s Department of Materials, working in collaboration with colleagues from Exeter and Munster have developed an on-chip optical processor capable of detecting similarities in datasets up to 1,000 times faster than conventional machine learning algorithms running on electronic processors. Researchers at Oxford University’s Department of Materials, working in collaboration with colleagues from … Read more

New glass-ceramic emits light when under mechanical stress

WASHINGTON — Researchers have created a new glass-ceramic that emits light in response to mechanical stress, a property known as mechanoluminescence. With further development, the new material could be used to create a light source that is switched on by mechanical stress. This could be useful for monitoring stress in artificial joints in the body … Read more

Light polarization creates art, explains mathematical concepts

WASHINGTON, July 22, 2022 – The polarization of light underpins a variety of recent technological innovations, including 3D cinema and LCDs. In LCDs, tiny electronically controllable liquid crystal elements are sandwiched between polarizers. If, instead, other transparent polarization-altering films – like cellophane gift wrap and packaging tape – are placed between a set of polarizers, … Read more

Lasers light the way to discovery of ancient crust beneath WA

By firing lasers finer than a human hair at tiny grains of a mineral extracted from beach sand, Curtin researchers have found evidence of an almost four billion-year-old piece of the Earth’s crust that lies beneath the South-West of WA. A beach sand sample collection site near Augusta. In a new finding that helps explain … Read more