First stars and black holes

Just milliseconds after the universe’s Big Bang, chaos reigned. Atomic nuclei fused and broke apart in hot, frenzied motion. Incredibly strong pressure waves built up and squeezed matter so tightly together that black holes formed, which astrophysicists call primordial black holes. Credit: LIGO/Caltech/MIT/R. Hurt (IPAC) Just milliseconds after the universe’s Big Bang, chaos reigned. Atomic … Read more

Study examines ‘black boxing’ in breast cancer survivorship care

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — Today, many women diagnosed with breast cancer live long after completing their cancer treatments and have post-treatment health and information needs. Unfortunately, across healthcare systems, survivorship care is neither consistent nor systematically implemented. Credit: SPP/UC Riverside. RIVERSIDE, Calif. — Today, many women diagnosed with breast cancer live long after completing their cancer … Read more

Black patients found six times more likely to have advanced vision loss after glaucoma diagnosis than white patients

Black patients have a dramatically higher risk of advanced vision loss after a new diagnosis of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) when compared to white patients, according to a new study from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE). Black patients have a dramatically higher risk of advanced vision loss after a … Read more

Iceland: Alarm sounded over ‘beautiful but deadly’ black sand beach and sneaker waves

Iceland’s most famous black sand beach is a lure for international visitors, but a combination of geology and the raw power of the ocean make it a deadly attraction. The black sands and roaring waves of Reynisfjara beach are among the main attractions along the scenic south coast of Iceland. It’s known for its haunting … Read more

Recognizing Black expertise could encourage more interest in science, says professor

A Dalhousie professor believes focusing on Black history could be a key element in getting more Black students involved in science, technology, engineering and math, also known by the acronym STEM. Professor Afua Cooper, a historian and a Killam Research Chair of Black History and African Diaspora Studies at Dalhousie University, will be hosting a … Read more

Physiological features of Japanese black cattle with high methane production

Japan’s agricultural sector produced 32.3 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions in 2022, accounting for 2.8% of the country’s total emissions. Nearly a quarter of that stems from enteric fermentation within livestock. Ruminants – grazing animals such as cattle, sheep and goats that acquire nutrients from plant-based diets – give off enteric methane as they … Read more

Where once were black boxes, NIST’s new LANTERN illuminates – BIOENGINEER.ORG

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new statistical tool that they have used to predict protein function. Not only could it help with the difficult job of altering proteins in practically useful ways, but it also works by methods that are fully interpretable – an advantage over conventional … Read more

Jun 18: Black Death origins, chicken domestication, the life of a mastodon and more…

On this week’s episode of Quirks & Quarks with Bob McDonald: The Black Death was history’s most lethal plague. Now we know where it started A team of historians, archeologists and geneticists, including Philip Slavin from Stirling University in Scotland, has identified what they believe to be ground zero in the medieval bubonic plague pandemic … Read more

Minorities in Shark Sciences helping Black students

As the ocean warms during the summer months, whales, sharks, turtles and other marine life are coming north to Maritime waters. Over the past several years, sightings of great whites and other large sharks have been more common along the US eastern seaboard and into the Maritimes. But marine biologist Carlee Jackson says shark populations … Read more

Institutional racism linked to worse asthma outcomes for Black Pittsburghers – BIOENGINEER.ORG

PITTSBURGH, June 16, 2022 – Redlining – a discriminatory mortgage lending practice instituted in the 1930s – resulted in health impacts that reverberate today, contributing to long-term environmental and asthma-related inequities that disproportionately affect Black Pittsburgh residents, according to a new analysis by the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health scientists. PITTSBURGH, June 16, … Read more